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The Shogunate: History of Japan

The Shogunate: History of Japan


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Shogunate: Japan's feudal period - History of Japan

Japan, today, has been a parliamentary constitutional monarchy since 1868, after the Meiji Restoration, after the Boshin War, ended shogunate and returned the main power to the Emperor.

At that time, the samurai class lost its prestige and its reputation declined to the point of being persecuted and extinguished, the shogun had his lands and power taken by the Emperor and finally, after six centuries, a civil government was reestablished.

Before that, Japan was a feudal military government directly governed by the shogun, who was a kind of military dictator who controlled all of Japan and was the governor in fact of the whole country as the Emperor, was the ruler de swear.

The Shogunate emerged after the seizure of power by Kamakura clan. Minamoto no Yoritomo (1147 - 1199) became the first ruling shogun and began the period now known as the Kamakura Period, establishing a feudal system where samurai, who were once simple soldiers belonging to a low position in the military hierarchy, rose to power and were placed above the aristocracy to serve the shogun directly.

However, there were times when the shogunate was overthrown by a coup d'état perpetrated by another clan to seize the power of the clan that ruled Japan, starting another shogunate, causing the shogunate to be divided into three periods: Kamakura period (1185 - 1333), Ashikaga Period (1336 - 1573) and Tokugawa Period (1603 - 1868).


The Tokugawa Shogunate

The last of the “Three Great Unifiers” of Japan, Tokugawa Ieyasu, was bestowed with the title of shogun (generalissimo) by the Emperor in 1603. Ending the era of constant warfare between daimyo (feudal lords), Ieyasu left behind the legacy of a relatively stable and peaceful society that lasted more than two centuries.

The feudal lords, who either supported or opposed the Tokugawa, were mostly left in place. However, they were made to swear an oath of allegiance to the Tokugawa shogun, and great efforts were taken to ensure individual daimyo did not form alliances between themselves.

To ensure the primacy of Tokugawa rule, the system of sankin kotai (alternate attendance) was put in place, where the daimyo had to spend alternate years in the capital of Edo. Once they returned to their own domains, the wives and children of these lords would stay behind in Edo, essentially being held in custody — albeit living comfortable, lavish lives — in the capital. It worked, and essentially, there were no real challenges to Tokugawa rule during the period.


A Brief History of the Tokugawa Shogunate


Public Domain, Link

For the country’s entire history, even its prehistory, the official supreme ruler of Japan has been the hereditary head of the Imperial Family, usually the Emperor (or rarely, Empress). But the men wielding actual political and military power in Japan were not royals. The most famous leaders of Japan were the shogun – a shortened version of the title Sei-i Taishogun, which translates as Commander in Chief of the Expeditionary Force Against the Barbarians.

The name first appeared sometime during the classical Heian period, 794–1185, when the Imperial Kyoto court was still attempting to assert control over the archipelago, some inhabitants of which were considered barbarians. But the first dominant shogun was Minamoto Yoritomo, who established the first bafaku (literally, “tent government,” based on the military nature of his leadership) in 1192. This bafaku also elevated the warrior, or samurai, class above all but the top nobility.


By Utagawa Sadahide – Public Domain, Link

As the “Commander in Chief” title indicates, this shogun was a military dictator with supreme power, and the basic governmental structure of the bafaku endured for an epic stretch of Japanese history, ultimately lasting nearly seven centuries, from 1192 to 1867, when the Emperor was restored to head of government in what is known as the Meiji Restoration. During this time, the Imperial Family served as a unifying, but impotent symbol the real power was wielded by the shogun.

The first ruling shogunate arose with the 150-year Kamakura period, 1192-1333, followed by another during what is known as the Muromachi Period, from 1338-1573. Japan was not yet a truly unified country, thus this era was a feudal period during which competing warlords (or daimyo) fought for control of the archipelago.

Growing trade between the various regions of the country led many daimyo to rebel against centralized control (from Kyoto), and in 1467 the Onin War launched the period known to Japanese as the Sengoku, or the Warring States period. For the next 150 years there was nearly constant warfare between regional warlords, numerous clans fighting for control of the country over the decades, handing it back and forth amid much chaos and destruction.


Public Domain, Link

What history now shorthands as the shogunate arose when one clan, the Tokugawa, finally defeated the others, uniting the country under one government. The Tokugawa shoguns would rule a relatively peaceful Japan for more than 250 years, from 1603 to 1867. It was during this time that Japan became the country that we recognize today.

The Tokugawa Shogunate was begun by its victorious first shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu, who was named shogun by the Emperor Go-Yozei in 1603. But after only two years in power, he abdicated the throne, handing it to his son, Tokugawa Hidetada. Ieyasu maintained control until his death 11 years later, but this maneuver established the hereditary nature of the shogunate, which it would be maintained through 15 Tokugawa shoguns, until 1867.

The Tokugawa Shogunate was, by and large, a peaceful period, but it was not exactly easy. The intrigues of the Tokugawa clan down through the centuries were very much the match of the European dynasties of the same era in their betrayals and violence. And for most Japanese, living in one of the four classes the shoguns (and the nobility, or daimyo) ruled – the samurai, the farmers, the artisans and the merchants – life under the rigid hierarchy of the shogunate was hardly carefree.


By E. Roevens – Le Monde Illustré, Public Domain, Link

The shogunate was based in a new city far to the east of the longtime capital, Kyoto, called Edo – today’s Tokyo – which is why the shogunate is also called the Edo Period. This period was marked by stability, but that stability came at a cost. Minority Christians were persecuted as threats, social mobility was impossible, and the policy of isolationism known as sakoku meant that Japanese culture was a closed system. The laws enforcing that system were strict: Leaving the country was punishable by death, should one return even receiving a letter from abroad could get an entire family killed.

Given these strict limits, it was perhaps inevitable that the Tokugawa shogunate would fall of its own weight, unable to respond to changing circumstances – particularly the encroachment of the rest of the world in the mid-19th century. The modern world was knocking on Japan’s door, and the isolated country the shoguns had created and maintained for nearly three centuries was unable to withstand the pressure.


Photo by hans-johnson

When a rebel group of daimyo united to support the restoration of the Imperial Family to power, the brittle shogunate collapsed. In 1868, the Emperor Meiji became the country’s ruler, and immediately instituted a dizzying array of modernizations to what was suddenly no longer a feudal society. With a jolt, the Tokugawa shogunate was gone, and Japan had entered the modern world.


Prosperity and Downfall

One important tool in the shogun's armory was the alternate attendance system, under which daimyo had to spend half of their time in the shogun's capital at Edo (now Tokyo) and the other half out in the provinces. This ensured that the shoguns could keep an eye on their underlings and prevented the lords from becoming too powerful and causing trouble.

The peace and prosperity of the Tokugawa era continued until the mid-19th century when the outside world rudely intruded on Japan in the form of Commodore Matthew Perry's black ships. Faced with the threat of western imperialism, the Tokugawa government collapsed. The daimyo lost their land, titles, and power during the resulting Meiji Restoration of 1868, although some were able to transition to the new oligarchy of the wealthy industrialist classes.


Tokugawa Japan and Medieval Europe

Japan is now one of Australia&rsquos major trading partners. Japanese society in the Tokugawa period was dominated by the Shoguns who ruled on behalf of the Emperor. While Japanese society developed in some different ways to Western European society, we can also see many similarities in this development as well. As historians, our aim is to develop a deeper understanding of Japanese culture and history by investigating and comparing our development.

TASK: Answer the following question in correct persuasive essay form. A correct bibliography must be used. The research booklet, all notes, preparatory drafts must also be submitted. NB. Photocopies/print outs with highlighting are not regarded as notes.

&ldquoThere were many uncanny similarities between the social and military/warrior features of Tokugawa Japan and those of Medieval Europe, considering they developed in isolation from one another.&rdquo

Do you agree, partly agree or disagree with this statement? Justify your response using historical evidence as proof.


Where you can still experience Edo?

Even today, there are a number of tourist attractions that offer Edo experiences with unique features. Here are some recommendations where you can get an exciting Edo experience in Tokyo or the surroundings!

Little ‘Edo’ Kawagoe

If you are looking for the ultimate Edo experience, head to Kawagoe. The small town, also known as Ko-Edo (which means “Little Edo”), is often described as a place where you can relive history. The town has managed to maintain the charming ambiance dating back to the Edo-period. Kawagoe can be reached in just under an hour from Tokyo by train, making it a perfect day trip to escape the vibrant city of Tokyo.

Originating from the Edo period, Kawagoe was a bustling commercial supply town. Due to its strategic position the city grew into a strong trade city, supplying Tokyo up until about 100 year ago. Nowadays one of the main attractions of the city is the Kitain Temple, home to the only remaining structures of Edo castle.


The Shogunate: History of Japan - History

1600—William Adams Arrives in Japan
Japan's first visitor from England, William Adams was a pilot on the Liefde, a Dutch vessel that shipwrecked off southern Japan. The only one of 24 survivors coherent enough to greet the Japanese boarding party, Adams was taken to Tokugawa Ieyasu, the country's strongest daimyo. Luckily for Adams, Ieyasu was interested in his knowledge of shipbuilding and navigation, and Adams became the daimyo's trusted interpreter and commercial agent. He was awarded the samurai privilege of wearing two swords.

1600—Battle of Sekigahara
Over 160,000 warriors participated in the battle that would unify Japan under the rule of the Tokugawa shoguns. In fewer than six hours, Tokugawa Ieyasu achieved victory over Ishida Misunari and took control of Japan.

1603—Ieyasu Moves Capital to Edo
In 1603, the emperor awarded Tokugawa Ieyasu the title of Shogun, the "barbarian-subduing generalissimo." Ieyasu now had the authority to rule Japan in all military matters. Under his rule, Edo (modern-day Tokyo) became the seat of government and the most important city in Japan. Ieyasu ordered Japan's daimyo warlords to supply labor and materials to build his new castle and to expand the city.

1605—Hidetada Becomes Second Shogun
Japan's second shogun was Ieyasu's third son, Hidetada, a military general who fought in the sieges of Osaka Castle and skirmishes leading up to the Battle of Sekigahara. Hidetada was officially appointed as shogun in 1605, guaranteeing shogunal succession in the Tokugawa family at a time when Japan's emperor had not fully recognized dynastic claims. Despite Hidetada's promotion, Ieyasu continued to rule under the title Ogoshosama (his retired majesty) until 1616. Following his father's death, Hidetada assumed power, and by arranging the marriage of his daughter to the emperor, further strengthened the power of the Tokugawa Shogunate.

1606—Anti-Christian Decrees Proclaimed


1610—Missionaries Expelled From Japan
Apprehensive about the spread of Christianity, Ieyasu expelled all Portuguese and Spanish missionaries, among them Joao Rodrigues.

1611—Dutch Set Up Factory at Hirado
Established in 1602, the Dutch East India Company sent two merchant ships to Japan in 1611. After obtaining a license from the Shogunate allowing them to trade in Japan, they set up the first Dutch trading house in Hirado.

1614—Ieyasu Prohibits Christian Activity
To maintain political stability, Ieyasu issued the Christian Expulsion Edict prohibiting all Christian activity among Japanese. The shogun also limited foreign trade to Hirado and Nagasaki.

1614—Siege of Osaka Castle
After rumors circulated that Hideyoshi's heir, Hideyori, intended to rebel against Ieyasu, a clash became imminent. Ieyasu insisted the Shogunate had been insulted by an inscription on a bell at temple constructed by Hideyori. With war looming, Hideyori appealed to the daimyos for help when no one responded, he opened his doors to thousands of ronin. Ieyasu's troops were initially unable to penetrate the outer defenses of Osaka Castle, Japan's strongest fortress. However, after Tokugawa's troops fired their cannons near the quarters of Hideyori's mother, she convinced her son to negotiate. Ieyasu offered a peaceful solution that allowed Hideyori to maintain his holdings and forces. Hideyori agreed, ordering his followers to lay down their arms. After a great show of withdrawing his armies, Ieyasu treacherously ordered Osaka Castle's outer moats be filled in, thereby weakening the fortress's defenses.

1615—Fall of Osaka Castle
After declaring peace with Ieyasu, Hideyori's commanders attempted to clear out Osaka Castle's moats, filled in by Tokugawa's forces. They built stockades, recruited ronin, and raised money from the provinces. But Ieyasu soon put his armies back in motion. In June 1615, with Ieyasu's son Hidetada in supreme command, the Tokugawa armies poured through the gates of Osaka Castle and burned it to the ground. As their forces were slaughtered, Hideyori and his mother committed suicide. Ieyasu completed his victory by ordering the execution of Hideyori's infant son, ending the threat of Toyotomi rule in Japan once and for all.

1616—Death of Ieyasu
After Osaka Castle's fall, Ieyasu returned home to Suruga and embarked on a hawking tour. Falling ill, he summoned his family and advised them to prepare for his death. Ieyesu was determined that the Tokugawa line should remain in power, and his dynasty seemed secure. Hidetada had been shogun for 12 years and his son, Iemitsu, was a spirited boy of twelve. If another heir became necessary, there were three other branches of the Tokugawa family—the Owari Tokugawa, Kii Tokugawa and the Mito Tokugawa. With the daimyo war-weary and ready to enjoy a life of peace, Tokugawa hegemony seemed assured.

1620—William Adams Dies
Adams, the first Englishman to set foot on Japanese soil, fell ill and died May 16, 1620 at the age of 56. He had been the Shogunate's revered trade advisor.

1623—Tokugawa Iemitsu Becomes 3rd Shogun
Ieyasu solidified the unification of Japan, but it was his grandson, Iemitsu, who laid the governing foundation for the Shogunate's 250-year rule. Iemitsu was the eldest, legitimate son of Hidetada, the second shogun. Hidetada had wanted his second son to become shogun, but thanks to the intervention of a wet nurse, Ieyasu designated Iemitsu as the preferred heir (after Hidetada's death, Iemitsu forced his younger brother to commit suicide).

1633—Shogunate Forbids Overseas Travel
In 1633, Iemitsu cracked down on overseas travel. Foreign ships were only permitted to enter Nagasaki Harbor, and Japanese ships had to be certified to travel abroad. Two years later certification was revoked, and all of Japan's ships were forbidden to leave the country. Japanese seamen could no longer work on foreign ships those who disobeyed were executed.

1635—Daimyo Lords Required to Reside Alternate Years in Edo
Shogun Iemitsu instituted Sankin Kotai or Alternate Attendance, which forced Japan's daimyo lords to reside in Edo during part of every other year. When not in Edo, the daimyo were required to leave their wives and family behind as hostages. Consequently, the daimyo spent considerable sums of money maintaining elaborate residences in Edo which housed their families and hundreds of samurai retainers. The processions from their domains to Edo were grand affairs of pomp and circumstance with hundreds or even thousands of guards, aides, advisors and servants. The policy effectively curtailed the power of the daimyo, depleting their treasuries and leaving little money for armies.

1637—Shimabara Uprising
Taxed near to starvation, peasants on the Shimabara Peninsula near Nagasaki revolted against the local daimyo, swarming into the abandoned Hara Castle. The uprising soon transformed into a Christian revolt. More than 40,000 rebels barricaded themselves along with their wives and children, holding off advancing government troops for over four months. Running out of provisions and weapons, the peasants finally surrendered only to be slaughtered by Iemitsu's troops.

1639—Shogunate Bans Portuguese Ships
After the Shimabara Rebellion, Iemitsu increasingly viewed Chritianity as a threat to the stability of Japan. He banned Portugese ships from Japan's shores and expelled all foreigners. The only exceptions were made for Dutch and Chinese traders.

1641—Dutch Confined to Dejima Island
Because the Dutch had never attempted to spread Christianity, the shogun exempted them from the ban on foreigners. But they were ordered to move from Hirado to Dejima, an artificial island in Nagasaki harbor which had been originally planned for the Portuguese. Together with the Chinese, the Dutch dominated foreign trade with Japan they also became the main source of information about Europe.

1651—Tokugawa Ietsuna Becomes 4th Shogun
Ietsuna, the eldest son of Iemitsu, became shogun at the age of ten following his father's death. Frequently ill, Ietsuna relied on members of his father's entourage, and ultimately was little more than a figurehead shogun. Still, Ietsuna's 30-year reign was a transitional period that solidified the Tokugawa family's rule of Japan.

1657—Great Edo Fire
Edo's many wooden buildings and narrow alleys made it prone to fire, and the city's many blazes were called the "flowers of Edo." The most destructive was the Meirike fire of 1657. Beginning in a small temple in Edo's northern section, the blaze was carried by flying sparks across moats and canals, demolishing dozens of daimyo estates near Edo castle. As winds shifted, the flames spread to the merchant quarters along the Sumida River elsewhere, a cooking fire from a samurai residence fed the inferno. Before the blaze was contained, most of Edo Castle had burned and 100,000 souls perished.

1680—Tokugawa Tsunayoshi Cecomes 5th Shogun
The fourth son of Tokugawa Iemitsu, Tsunayoshi was initially not in line for succession. However, Tsunayoshi served ably as daimyo of Tatebayashi, and Ietsuna, on his deathbed, adopted Tsunayoshi so that he could legally become shogun. Characterized by lavish spending and spiraling prices, Tsunayoshi's reign coincided with the Genroku Era, Edo's cultural renaissance. Tsunayoshi made his court a center of Chinese and Buddhist studies, and issued various edicts on "Compassion for Living." Among them was the death penalty for killing a dog. This earned Tsunayoshi much ridicule, and he became known as the "dog shogun."

1682—Saikaku Publishes First Books
Merchant turned writer Ihara Saikaku captured the imagination of the Edo society that emerged with its expanding and wealthy merchant class. One of the first to write about ordinary people, Saikaku's writings appealed to commoners as well as the idle samurai. Ironic and irreverent, Saikaku wrote in the vernacular of the day. His first novel, A Man Who Loved Love, was published in 1682, illustrated with Saikaku's own prints. A bawdy tale of a male traveler's amorous experiences with both sexes, it sold more than 1,000 copies in the first printing. The book was the first of a new genre known as ukiyo-zoshi (meaning "a tale of the floating world") that combined images with the written word.

1688—Start of Japanese Edo Renaissance
During the Genroku period, a cultural renaissance in Japan, both aristocratic and common arts flourished. Although ostentatious displays of wealth had been prohibited, vast amounts of time and money were spent at theaters, brothels and teahouses in Edo's pleasure districts. As a new urban culture developed in Edo, various art forms flourished including Kabuki theater, Ukiyo e and Bunraku puppet theater.

1690—Englebert Kaempfer Arrives in Japan
Sent by the Dutch East India Company to provide medical care on Dejima Island, German-born Englebert Kaempfer (1651 1716) spent two years in Japan, much of it gathering information about the isolated kingdom. During one of two trips to Edo, Kaempfer met with Shogun Tsunayoshi, and through the help of a young interpreter, unearthed many details of Japanese life. Published posthumously in 1727, Kaempfer's History of Japan provided vivid descriptions of Japanese life, and the book became an immediate best-seller, available in English, Dutch, French and Russian. It remained the Western world's principal reference on Japan for over two hundred years.


Tokugawa Shogunate (Japan, 1603 - 1868)

KEY TOPICS
The period between 1603 to 1868 in the history of Japan when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional Daimyo. [1] KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS Buke first appeared during the Heian Period, and came to dominate Japan from 1185 to 1868 AD. The Edo period, or Tokugawa period, is the period between 1603 and 1867 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional Daimyo. [1] The Edo Period is a span of Japanese history is characterized by a feudal system ruled over by the Tokugawa Shogunate, that lasted from 1603 to 1868 CE. A brief period of vigorous international exchange with the West took place during the early Edo period (1603 to 1867), until Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu grew wary of the growing influence of Christianity on Japanese society, and stamped his policy of national seclusion on the nation. [1] The Edo Period is a span of Japanese history is characterized by a feudal system ruled over by the Tokugawa Shogunate, that lasted from 1603 to 1868 CE. After the turbulence of the Sengoku period and the establishment of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1603, old temples like Hieizan, Tō-ji and Tōdai-ji lost their power and the schools of Buddhism were surpassed in influence by the Nichiren-shū and Jōdo-shū. [1]

Between 1603 and 1868 Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate, a period known as the Edo period. [1]

In the Edo (江) or Tokugawa (徳) period between 1603 to 1868, Japan was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate, a form of military rule headed by the shogun. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate ( 徳川幕府, Tokugawa bakufu ?, 1603 -- 1868 ), or Edo bakufu, was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family. [1] If you are interested in Edo (present -day Tokyo) period (1603-1868, from 1603 when Tokugawa Shogun ruled Japan to 1868 when Tokugawa shogunate was overthrown and the capital and imperial residence were moved from Kyoto to Tokyo and the imperial family took over the Edo Castle site. [1] It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan from 1603 to 1868, during this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a floating world. [1] Early Meiji Japan 1868-1912 1. 2 The Tokugawa Shogunate Tokugawa family ruled Japan from 1603 until 1868 - also known as the Edo period 1635 - foreign. [1]

The Tokugawa Shogunate was the last feudal Japanese military government which existed between 1603 and 1868 and is named after the Tokugawa clan. [1] KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS KEY TOPICS " alt"How was Japan’s imperialist experience unique? The Opening of Japan The Tokugawa Shogunate had restricted Japan to foreigners and forbid Japanese travel In 1603, he had himself appointed shōgun and established the Tokugawa shogunate at Edo (modern Tokyo ). [1] The Edo period, or Tokugawa period, is the period between 1603 and 1867 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional Daimyo The Sengoku period ( 戦国時代, Sengoku jidai, "Age of Warring States" c. 1467 - c. 1603) is a period in Japanese history marked by social upheaval, political intrigue and near-constant military conflict. [1] In Japanese history, the political revolution in 1868 that brought about the final demise of the Tokugawa shogunate (military government)--thus ending the Edo (Tokugawa) period (1603-1867)--and, at least nominally, returned control of the country to direct imperial rule under Mutsuhito (the emperor Meiji). [1] The Tokugawa shogunate imposed a strict class system on Japanese society, the American Perry Expedition in 1853-54 ended Japans seclusion, this in turn contributed to the fall of the shogunate and the return of power to the Emperor in 1868 The first major references to Japanese naval actions against other Asian powers occur in the accounts of the Mongol invasions of Japan by Kublai Khan in 1281. [1]

The Tokugawa Shogunate was a military dictatorship in Japan that lasted for almost three hundred years, from 1603 to 1868. [1] The former war produced the Kamakura Shogunate (1185-1333) the latter series of conflicts culminated in the Tokugawa Shogunate, which then ruled Japan from 1603 to 1868. [1] The Edo period lasted from 1603 to 1868, wherein Japan was ruled largely by the Tokugawa Shogunate and regional daimyo. [1]

This course surveys Japanese history from the establishment of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1603 to the present and explores the local and global nature of modernity in Japan. [1]

Japan's Tokugawa (or Edo) period, which lasted from 1603 to 1867, would be the final era of traditional Japanese government, culture and society before the Meiji Restoration of 1868 toppled the long-reigning Tokugawa shoguns and propelled the country into the modern era. [1] Tokugawa Ieyasu received the title Seii Taishogun in 1603, and abdicated in favour of his son Tokugawa Hidetada in 1605 (while retaining real control himself), to emphasize the family's hereditary hold on the post he thereby established Japan's final shogunate, which lasted until the Meiji Restoration in 1868. [1]

The period marks the governance of the Edo or Tokugawa Shogunate which was also officially established in 1603 by the first Edo shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu The first two books produced in Japan appeared during this period, the Kojiki and Nihon Shoki,Henshall, 24. which contains chronicles of legendary accounts of early Japan and its creation myth, which explains the imperial line being descendants of the gods.Henshall, 56. [1] The Tokugawa had unprecedented power over all daimyo, religious orders, the court, and even the emperor himself. (Dolan, Japan) In 1603, Ieaysu was made shogun by the emperor and established his new government in Edo. (Z., Shogunate ) The Tokugawa rebuilt the imperial family’s palaces, though, and gave them new lands. [1]

The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu ( 徳川幕府 ) and the Edo bakufu ( 江戸幕府 ), was the last feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1600 and 1868. [2] During this long time Japanese society was ruled by the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional feudal lords Tokugawa Shogunate The Tokugawa Shogunate were a feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1600 and 1868. [1]

By the end of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1868, the Japanese navy of the shogun already possessed eight western-style steam warships. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate did not officially share this point of view and not until the beginning of the Meiji Era in 1868 did the Japanese government begin to modernize the military. [1]

The Tokugawa shogunate ruled from Edo Castle from 1603 until 1868, when it was abolished during the Meiji Restoration. [1] Prior to becoming the capital in 1868, the city was named Edo (江戸, meaning "estuary") and served as the power-base for the Tokugawa Shogunate between 1603 and 1868. [1] One hundred years later, shipping in the natural harbor grew significantly during the Edo period (1603 - 1868) when it became a port for the Tokugawa shogunate navy. [1] In 1603, Tokugawa Ieyasu completed this task and established the Tokugawa Shogunate, which would rule in the emperor's name until 1868. [1]

For more than 100 years before the Tokugawa Shogunate took power in Japan in 1603, the country wallowed in lawlessness and chaos during the Sengoku ("Warring States") period of 1467 to 1573. [1] Tokugawa shogunate : The last feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1603 and 1867. [1] According to Columbia University’s Asia for Educators: "The Charter Oath was a short but very important public document issued in April 1868, just months after the Meiji Restoration brought an end to the Tokugawa shogunate and installed a new Japanese government. [1] Tokugawa Ieyasu - Tokugawa Ieyasu was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan, which effectively ruled Japan from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration in 1868. [1] The Meiji Restoration was a chain of events, triggered by an internal crisis and strong anti-Western sentiments, that ended the Edo period and thus the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and restored practical imperial rule to Japan in 1868 under Emperor Meiji. [1] On this day in 1868, the abolition of the Tokugawa shogunate (the feudal regime of Japan ruled by the Tokugawa family) fuels the Meiji Restoration. [1] …established the machinery for the Tokugawa shogunate, the last feudal military dictatorship of Japan, which would last until 1868. [1]

The late Tokugawa shogunate ( Japanese : 幕末 Bakumatsu ) was the period between 1853 and 1867, during which Japan ended its isolationist foreign policy called sakoku and modernized from a feudal shogunate to the Meiji government. [2] SHIMAZU TADATSUNE ( 島津忠恒, November 27, 1576 April 7, 1638): he was a tozama daimy ō ("outside daimy ō ", a daimy ō who was considered an outsider by the rulers of Japan ) of Satsuma, the first to hold it as a formal fief ( han ) under the Tokugawa shogunate, and the first Japanese to rule over the Ryūkyū Kingdom Lost Decade (Japan) - The Lost Decade or the Lost 10 Years is the time after the Japanese asset price bubbles collapse within the Japanese economy. [1]

The period marks the governance of the Edo or Tokugawa shogunate, which was officially established in 1603 by the first Edo shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu. [1] …the official doctrine of the Tokugawa shogunate (the hereditary military dictatorship through which the Tokugawa family ruled Japan from 1603 to 1867). [1] It took place among the troubled events of the Late Tokugawa shogunate from 1854 to 1868, associated with the opening of Japan to the European and American powers. [1] When the Tokugawa shogunate growing increasingly weak by the mid-19th century, two powerful clans joined forces in early 1868 to seize power as part of an "imperial restoration" named for Emperor Meiji. [1] With the collapse of the Tokugawa shogunate and the final defeat of Tokugawa loyalists in the Boshin War (1868 - 1869), the Emperor Meiji was restored to direct suzerainty and the imperial court (and national capital) was moved to Edo, renamed Tōkyō ("Eastern Capital"). [1]

Tokugawa Japan - 1603 to 1868 With fall of Ashikaga Shogunate, Japan falls into a period of Civil War Unification of Japan began in the mid- sixteenth. [1] Edo Period (江戸時代): A period of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1868 AD during which Japan was ruled by Tokugawa Ieyasu and his descendants. [1] It was the center of the rice trade during the Edo Period of 1603 through 1868, when the Tokugawa shōgunate ruled Japan while the Emperor lived in Kyōto with little power. [1] Edo period (1603 - 1867) 1603 Ieyasu is appointed shogun and establishes the Tokugawa government in Edo (Tokyo). 1614 Ieyasu intensifies persecution of Christianity. 1639 Almost complete isolation of Japan from the rest of the world. 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry forces the Japanese government to open a limited number of ports for trade. [1] In its efforts to close Japan off from damaging foreign influence, the Tokugawa shogunate also prohibited trade with Western nations and prevented Japanese merchants from trading abroad. [1] Sakoku was the foreign relations policy of Japan, enacted by the Tokugawa shogunate through a number of edicts and policies from 1633-39, under which severe restrictions were placed on the entry of foreigners to Japan and Japanese people were forbidden to leave the country without special permission. [1] The system outlined above, whereby Japan used four portals to carry out three categories of foreign interaction ( tsūshin, tsūshō, and buiku ) was the basis for a Japan-centered regional order that gradually took shape in the early modern era--in essence, a Japanese version of the Sinocentric world order, with the Tokugawa shogunate at the summit. [1] The Rise of the Tokugawa Shogunate and the Isolation of Japan FONTS Source Study - Policies to Strengthen Feudalism Text according to Dai Nihon Shiryô, from Chronological Source Books of Japanese History, volume 12, part 22, p. 19 ff., WB, Historiographical Institute, University of Tokyo Trade and Christianity Influences Ieyasu was not initially opposed to foreign trade. [1]

The castle's Ninomaru Palace was famous for its "nightingale" (creaking) floors that warn of intruders. (Hem., 2/96, p.60) 1603 Tokyo replaced Kyoto as the administrative center of Japan. (WSJ, 1/11/99, p.R51) 1603-1868 The founding and era of the Tokugawa Shogunate. (Jap. [1] Tokugawa Ieyasu was appointed shōgun by Emperor Go-Yōzei in 1603 and established the Tokugawa shogunate in Edo (modern Tokyo ). [1] The Tokugawa shogunate was officially established in Edo on 24 March 1603 by the shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu. [1] The Edo period from 1600 to 1868 characterized early modern Japan, the Tokugawa shogunate was a feudal regime of Japan established by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate was overthrown by the Meiji Restoration on 3 May 1868, the fall of Edo and the restoration of Tenno's rule at the reign of fifteenth and last shogun Tokugawa Yoshinobu. [1] The Edo Period lasted for nearly 260 years until the Meiji Restoration in 1868, when the Tokugawa Shogunate ended and imperial rule was restored. [1] January 4, 1868: Formal restoration of imperial rule end of 265 years of rule by the Tokugawa Shogunate. [1] In January 1868, combined military forces of the domains of Satsuma and Chshū marched into Kyoto, took control of the imperial palace, and proclaimed the restoration of the emperor and the abolition of the Tokugawa shogunate. [1] The Tokugawa Shogunate came to an official end in 1868, with the resignation of the 15th Tokugawa Shogun, Tokugawa Yoshinobu and the "restoration" ('Taisei Hōkan') of imperial rule. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate came to an official end in 1868 with the resignation of the 15th Tokugawa shōgun Tokugawa Yoshinobu, leading to the "restoration" ( 王政復古, Ōsei fukko ) of imperial rule. [2]

The fall of Edo in 1868 marked the end of the Tokugawa shogunate, and a new era, Meiji, was proclaimed. [1] In 1590, Tokugawa Ieyasu, founder of the Tokugawa shogunate, took Edo Castle as headquarters and, in 1603, Edo became the political center of this shogunate. [1] Tokugawa Ieyasu (1542-1616) founded the shogunate in Edo (now Tokyo) walter mitty character essay in The Economy and the Environment 1603 that endured for more than 260 years after skillfully surviving a tokugawa shogunate turbulent era of. [1] The Tokugawa Shogunate was begun by its victorious first shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu, who was named shogun by the Emperor Go-Yozei in 1603. [1]

In 1603, Ieyasu Tokugawa who became a generalissimo shogun started the Edo Shogunate. [1] POSSIBLY USEFUL POSSIBLY USEFUL POSSIBLY USEFUL POSSIBLY USEFUL POSSIBLY USEFUL POSSIBLY USEFUL POSSIBLY USEFUL Early Modern Edo or Tokugawa period (1603 1867) An era of peace, where power was centralized by hereditary shogunate in a class society The Taisho Period ("period of good righteousness"), or Taisho Era, is an interval into the reputation for Japan dating from July 30, 1912, to December 25, 1926, coinciding because of the reign associated with Taisho Emperor. [1] The Tokugawa shoguns changed social class structures, agriculture, and manufacturing in the country by consolidating trends which had been in the making for some time (East Asia, p. 279) and brought Japan into a unified and productive state which lasted from about 1603 until 1800 During the Sengoku period or the Warring State period from 1467 AD to about 1573 AD, the Ashikaga Shogunate could not secure the loyalty of the daimyo, the feudal lords of Japan. [1] Art of the Edo period "Fūjin and Raijin" by Tawaraya Sōtatsu Three Beauties of the Present Day, by Utamaro, c. 1793 The Tokugawa shogunate gained undisputed control of the government in 1603 with a commitment to bring peace and economic and political stability to the country in large measure it was successful. [1] In 1603, he had himself appointed shōgun and established the Tokugawa shogunate at Edo (modern Tokyo ). [1] In 1603, the Tokugawa shogunate was established, with its capital at Edo, in 1614, the Toyotomi clan rebuilt Osaka Castle. [1] In 1603, the Tokugawa Shogunate was established, a military and dictatorial government, led by a"shogun"(leader of the armed forces). [1] In your answer define what a military junta is and how the Tokugawa Shogunate came to power in 1603. [1]

The period in Japanese history in which the Tokugawa Shogunate held power is called the Edo period, after the capital of Japan during the shogunate. [1] The Tokugawa Shogunate marks the period in Japanese history when the feudal system was most rigid, leading eventually to social unrest, culminating in an overthrow of the shogunate and the installation of Emperor Meiji. [1] It was initiated by the Ōnin War, which collapsed the Japanese feudal system under Ashikaga shogunate, and came to an end when the system was re-established under the Tokugawa shogunate by Tokugawa Ieyasu The Philippine Army, as well as remnants of the U.S. Army Forces Far East, continued to fight the Japanese in a guerrilla war and was considered an auxiliary unit of the United States Army. [1] The very rapid modernization (Westernization) of the country was resulting in massive changes to Japanese culture, language, dress and society, and appeared to many samurai to be a betrayal of the jōi ("Expel the Barbarian") portion of the Sonnō jōi justification used to overthrow the former Tokugawa shogunate. [1] To further ensure control, the Tokugawa shogunate enforced a seclusion policy starting in the 1630s that banned Japanese from leaving the country, and allowed only the Chinese and Dutch to conduct trade, but only on a limited basis and only at the port city of Nagasaki in Kyushu. [1] By the end of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1867, the Japanese navy of the shogun already possessed eight Western-style steam warships around the flagship Kaiyō Maru, which were used against pro-imperial forces during the Boshin war, under the command of Admiral Enomoto. [1] Heirlooms of the clan are partly administered by the Tokugawa Memorial Foundation, the Tokugawas clan crest, known in Japanese as a mon, the triple hollyhock, has been a readily recognized icon in Japan, symbolizing in equal parts the Tokugawa clan and the last shogunate The history of Japan includes the history of the islands of Japan and the Japanese people, spanning the ancient history of the region to the modern history of Japan as a nation state. [1]

During the next time period time known as the Edo period 1603 to 1868, Tokugawa and his army finally brought peace to Japan. [1] åº) (also known as the Edo bakufu) was a feudal military dictatorship of Japan established in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family until 1868. [1] "The Edo period (江戸時代 Edo jidai?), or Tokugawa period (徳川時代 Tokugawa jidai?), is a division of Japanese history which was ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family, running from 1603 to 1868. [1]

These developments undermine the prestige of the Tokugawa shogunate and, in 1868, a group of officials and daimyos around the emperor force the shogun to abdicate. [1] The Chōshū and Satsuma domains in 1868 convinced the young Emperor Meiji and his advisors to issue a rescript calling for an end to the Tokugawa shogunate. [1] The Meiji Restoration saw the overthrow of the Tokugawa shogunate and the restoration of the Emperor Meiji in 1868. [1] He told me an interesting story about the history of his company: DKSH originated from Siber & Brennwald, which was founded in Yokohama during Bakumatsu, the final years of the Tokugawa Shogunate (1603-1868) before the Meiji Restoration started in 1868. [1] Notwithstanding its eventual overthrow in favor of the more modernized, less feudal form of governance of the Meiji Restoration, the Tokugawa shogunate oversaw the longest period of peace and stability in Japan's history, lasting well over 260 years. [2] During this long time Japanese society was ruled by the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional feudal lords The revolution in politics during the Kamakura Period was matched by changes in Japanese society and culture. [1] During this long time Japanese society was ruled by the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional feudal lords The Yamato polity evolved greatly during the Asuka period, which is named after the Asuka region, the introduction of Buddhism marked a change in Japanese society. [1] During this long time Japanese society was ruled by the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional feudal lords Japanese militarism - The military had a strong influence on Japanese society from the Meiji Restoration. [1] During this long time Japanese society was ruled by the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional feudal lords I then transferred the characters into an MS Excel spreadsheet so I could make a template for spacing and alignment purposes. (There's a precedent for this: modern Japanese use ready-made templates for the devotional practice of copying Buddhist sutras.) [1]

The Tokugawa Shogunate was the shogunate in modern Japanese history, which succeeded in centralizing the power of the nation's government and people during its 265-year rule. [1] The Tokugawa ottoman empire involvement in world war 1 shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府?), tokugawa shogunate was the last feudal Japanese military government, catcher in the rye, holden which. 1. [1] Though greatly aiding Japanese modernisation (which is a completely different story, and I shall avoid going into any further detail), opening the ports to the Western world affected the Tokugawa shogunate. [1]

The Edo period begins with the official establishment of the Tokugawa Shogunate by Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1603 and ends with the Meiji Restoration. [1] The Tokugawa Shogunate would last over 250 years, only ending with the Meiji Restoration in 1868. [1] A civil war, known as the Boshin War, erupted in 1868 between the ruling Tokugawa Shogunate and Imperial factions. [1] He may have worn it during his defeat at the battle of Toba Fushimi (January 2, 1868), a watershed event in the transition from feudalism and the Tokugawa shogunate (1603-1868) to the Meiji era and the beginnings of modern Japan. [1]

The shogunate reacted as aggressively as any regime-under-attack might be expected to, but by the mid-1860s, Choshu was in the hands of an anti-Tokugawa administration, and by late 1868, Shogun Tokugawa Keiki concluded that the best way to preserve order was to resign as shogun and create a system in which he likely would share power as the chief among a council of leaders. [1] That, and the rulings of the Shogun immediately following the full consolidation of power in 1603, mean that cracks exist in the loyalty commanded by Tokugawa and that some clans remain openly hostile to the shogunate -with some just as fervently hostile but not openly so. [1] Ieyasu Tokugawa then fought his way to the Shogunate (1603). [1] Early Modern Edo or Tokugawa period (1603 1867) An era of peace, where power was centralized by hereditary shogunate in a class society The later years of the Muromachi period, 1467 to 1573, are also known as the Sengoku period (Period of Warring Kingdoms), a time of intense internal warfare, and correspond with the period of the first contacts with the West--the arrival of Portuguese " Nanban " traders. [1] Buke first appeared during the Heian Period, and came to dominate Japan from 1185 to 1868 AD. Tokugawa period (1603-1867), the final period of traditional Japan, a time of peace, stability, and growth under the shogunate Japan in the asuka period the Middle Ages Post abortion syndrome is also referred to as the "Classical Period" in Japan. [1]

The Meiji Restoration of 1868 ended the 265-year-old feudalistic Tokugawa shogunate. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate officially ended in 1868 when Tukugawa Yoshinobu, the 15th Tokugawa Shogun resigned. [1] In 1868, Tokugawa Yoshinobu resigns, the Tokugawa shogunate ends. [1] Wilson concludes that this increasing irrelevance in the realm of coastal, and national defense as well as the compromise of its legitimacy due to the loss of the monopolization of violence played no small role in the downfall of the Tokugawa Shogunate in 1868. [1] Then it was dominated by the Tokugawa shogunate from 1602 until 1868. [1]

Tokugawa's influence would be so important that the years from 1603 until 1867 are called the Tokugawa Shogunate. [1] The Tokugawa family managed to ally the majority of the han on its side, establishing the Tokugawa shogunate in 1603. [1] The Restoration led to enormous changes in Japan's political and social structure, and spanned both the late Edo period (often called Late Tokugawa shogunate) and the beginning of the Meiji period. [1] At any rate, the passing of Sen no Rikyu removed from Japan's cultural scene the last great medieval figure and heralded the advent of the al- ready rapidly approaching early modern age. 7 The Flourishing of a Bourgeois Culture The great peace of more than two and a half centuries that followed the founding of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1600 was made possible largely by the policy of national seclusion which the shogunate adopted during the late 1 630s. [1]

The Edo period (1603-1868), when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate, was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, and stable population. [1] The tokugawa shogunate Edo Period (1603-1868) The Edo period of Japanese history lasted over Argue whether the works of Steinbeck are literature? two hundred and fifty years. com. [1] The most favorite and famous shogun in Japanese history is Tokugawa leyasu of the Tokugawa Period and the Tokugawa Shogunate. [1] By the end of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1867, the Japanese navy already possessed eight Western-style steam warships around the flagship Kaiyou Maru which were used against pro-imperial forces during the Boshin war, under the command of Admiral Enomoto Paul Varley's Japanese Culture is an excellent overview of Japanese history, with specific attention paid to the influence of Buddhism on Japanese culture. [1] By the end of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1867, the Japanese navy already possessed eight Western-style steam warships around the flagship Kaiyou Maru which were used against pro-imperial forces during the Boshin war, under the command of Admiral Enomoto Imperial Japanese Navy (大日本帝国海軍, Dai-Nihon Teikoku Kaigun ): The naval branch of the Japanese military from 1872 until 1945. [1]

Ii Naosuke managed to coerce the Tokugawa Shogunate to its last brief resurgence of its power and position in Japanese society before the start of the Meiji period. [1]

Your guide will also help you to learn about the imperial family, Japanese modernization history, etc. Tokugawa Ieyasu, in his quest to become absolute ruler of Japan defeated Hideyori loyalists in the battle of Sekigahara and was appointed Shogun by Hideyori in 1603. [1] In 1868 the Tokugawa military rulers were overthrown by supporters of Emperor Meiji (whose name means "enlightened rule"), marking the end of the Edo period and ushering in a new era of Japanese government. [1] In 1868, with the fall of the shogunate of the Tokugawa clan, the city was renamed as Tokyo (3 of September of 1868). [1] Includes the Formative Period (prehistory-A.D. 250) influence of Chinese civilization on Japan (300-794) Heian Period - emergence of uniquely Japanese cultural forms (794-1185) Kamakura Shogunate - establishment of military government (1185-1336) Ashikaga Shogunate - civil war and the reunification of Japan (1336-1573) Tokugawa Period (1600-1867) Meji Period (1868-1912) Taisho Period (1912-1925) Showa Period (1926-1989) and Heisei Period (1990 - present). [1] Early Modern Edo or Tokugawa period (1603 1867) An era of peace, where power was centralized by hereditary shogunate in a class society. [1] The shogunate was officially established in Edo on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu. [1] In 1603 a shogunate was established by a warrior, Tokugawa Ieyasu, in the city of Edo (present Tokyo). [3]

The Tokugawa Shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa Bakufu and the Edo Bakufu, was a feudal regime of Japan established by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa clan. [1] The Tokugawa Shogunate (1603-1868) was a feudal military state in Japan founded by Ieyasu Tokugawa and ruled by shoguns of the Tokugawa family. [1]

The Late Tokugawa Shogunate ( Bakumatsu ) is the period between 1853 and 1867 during which Japan ended its isolationist foreign policy called sakoku and modernized from a feudal shogunate to the Meiji government. [1] Between 1853 and 1867, Japan ended its isolationist foreign policy known as sakoku and changed from a feudal Tokugawa shogunate to the pre-modern empire of the Meiji government. [1]

It eliminated the Tokugawa Shogunate, which allowed the emperor to regain full power, and transformed Japan from a feudal system to a modern state. [1] The Sengoku period in Japan would eventually lead to the unification of political power under the Tokugawa shogunate. [1] The Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 established the power of the Tokugawa Shogunate over Japan and brought to an end the period of almost continuous warfare that preceded it. [1] At the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu's forces emerged victorious and, after a few more years of consolidating power, kicked off the Edo Period (1603-1868) of Japan which was defined by the rule of the Tokugawa Shogunate - where the leader of the clan is granted the ancient, hereditary title of "Shogun" and thus commands the loyalty of all "daimyo" (clan lords). [1] The Tokugawa shogunate was the government of the Tokugawa family who were shoguns, or hegemons, and dominated Japan during the Edo period (1603-1868). [1]

The next period of the Tokugawa Shogunate is the Empire of Japan, commonly called as the Imperial Japan or the Prewar Japan (Pre-World War II Japan). [1] Rangaku () or Dutch Learning was the method by which Japan kept abreast of Western technology and medicine in the period when the country was closed to foreigners, 1641-1853, because of the Tokugawa shogunates policy of national isolation (sakoku). [1]

Iwakura opposed the Tokugawa Shogunate's plans to end Japan's national isolation policy and to open Japan to foreign countries. [1] OK Japanese History By Jessica R. and Taryn W. First appearance of Japan in History Japan was first mentioned in history by the Chinese, in 57AD. Japan In 1863, Japan completed her first domestically-built steam warship, the Chiyodagata, a 140 ton gunboat commissioned into the Tokugawa Navy (Japan's first steamship was the Unkoumaru -雲行丸- built by the fief of Satsuma in 1855). [1]

One of the most significant figures in Japanese history is, Ieyasu, who was a warrior, statesman and the founder of the Tokugawa dynasty of shoguns in 1603. [1] History of Japanese Food in Edo 1603 Tokugawa Ieyasu founds the Bakufu government. [1]

It was the last feudal Japanese military government that ruled over Japan from 1603 through 1868. [1] This dynasty of military dictators ruled Japan from 1603 until 1868 during the Edo Period (also called the Tokugawa Period). [1] T he Tokugawa period, also known as the Edo period, began in 1603 and continued until 1868, when Japan finally ended her policy of isolationism. [1] The Edo Period (or Tokugawa Period), was a time of great stability and cultural preservation in Japan, lasting from 1603 to 1868. [1]

In 1868, the Tokugawa shogunate's rule came to an end and the Meiji Restoration began. [1] The Azuchi-Momoyama period ( 安土桃山時代, Azuchi-Momoyama jidai ? ) came at the end of the Warring States Period in Japan, when the political unification that preceded the establishment of the Tokugawa shogunate took place. [1] The period culminated with a series of three warlords, Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu, who gradually unified Japan, after Tokugawa Ieyasus final victory at the siege of Osaka in 1615, Japan settled down into several centuries of peace under the Tokugawa Shogunate. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate provided the longest period of internal peace Japan had ever enjoyed. [1] This was the Boshin War. (1868-69) Tokugawa shogunate was defeated and Emperor Meiji (Mutsuhito) became the new leader of Japan. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate not only consolidated their control over a reunified Japan, they also had unprecedented power over the emperor, the court, all daimyōs and the religious orders. [1] The Tokugawa Shogunate introduced the idea of feudalism to Japan, who before put all of their power in the hands of the Emperor. [1]

Known as the Tokugawa period due to the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate, the Edo period followed the Sengoku period where warlords fought for control of Japan, and succeeded the Momogama period (1573-1615). [1] The abolition of the Tokugawa shogunate was a definitive step towards modernisation and restoration of imperial rule in Japan. [1] Japan also progressed readily from its feudal shell because there was a ready substitute for the Tokugawa shogunate, an imperial infrastructure that had survived as a weakened remnant of ancient Japan. [1] At the time of Meiji's birth in 1852, Japan was an isolated, pre-industrial, feudal country dominated by the Tokugawa shogunate and the daimyo, who ruled over the country's more than 250 decentralized domains. [1] The country of Japan was run by the Tokugawa Shogunate which were the last family of Shogun to run Japan. [1] The founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate o f Japan. [1] Tokugawa Yoshinobu - Tokugawa Yoshinobu was the 15th and last shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan. [1] Perry’s arrival forced Japan to open its ports to Western vessels. 12 After expelling the Spanish and Portuguese from Japan in the early 17th century, the Tokugawa Shogunate maintained very limited international relations with the neighboring states of Korea, Ryukyu, and China, as well as the Netherlands in the West. [1] The policy was enacted by the Tokugawa shogunate under Tokugawa Iemitsu through a number of edicts and policies from 1633-39 and largely remained officially in effect until 1866, although the arrival of the American Black Ships of Commodore Matthew Perry, which started the forced opening of Japan to Western trade, eroded its enforcement severely. [1] It led directly to the establishment of diplomatic relations between Japan and the western Great Powers and eventually to collapse of the ruling Tokugawa shogunate. [1] It was after the Tokugawa shogunate was removed from power that Japan began modernisation the Meiji period (明治時代 Meiji-jidai) began. [1] By the end of the Tokugawa Shogunate, the Shimazu operated cotton production facilities throughout Japan with their main facility in Edo. [1] The supposed ruler of Japan the emperor was known as a du jure emperor, ruling by permission from the Tokugawa Shogunate. [1] After Hideyoshi's death in 1598, Tokugawa Ieyasu came to power and was appointed shogun by the Emperor, the Tokugawa shogunate, which governed from Edo (modern Tokyo), presided over a prosperous and peaceful era known as the Edo period (1600-1868). [1] The head of government was the shogun, and each was a member of the Tokugawa clan, the Tokugawa shogunate ruled from Edo Castle and the years of the shogunate became known as the Edo period. [1]

The era of the shogunate was known as the Edo period, and ruled from 1603 to 1868. [1] Edo Period 1603 - 1868 Reestablished Shogunate of Ieyasu - moved capitol to Edo. [1]

The American Perry Expedition in 1853-54 ended Japan's seclusion this contributed to the fall of the shogunate and the return of power to the Emperor in 1868. [1] The U.S. government aimed to end Japan's isolationist policies, the shogunate had no defense against Perry's gunboats and had to agree to his demands that American ships be permitted to acquire provisions and trade at Japanese ports. [1] The final, chaotic years of the Tokugawa period are fascinating for the momentous political events that led to the overthrow of the shogunate, but they are not especially important to Japanese cultural history and hence may be briefly summarized here. [1] The Japanese people's great respect for education and learning carried over from the Tokugawa period, as evidenced by the establishment of the Ministry of Education in 1871, only three years after the fall of the shogunate, and the promulgation of a law in 1872 to make education universal. [1]

Under discussion in this essay is the bakufu or shogunate founded by Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543-1616) in the year 1603. [1]

Azuchi-Momoyama Period (安土・桃山時代): A period of Japanese history running from 1573 to 1603 AD. During this period, the warlords Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu put an end to over a century of fighting Ieyasu eventually established himself as shogun Kofun (Tumulus) Period (古墳時代): A period of Japanese history running from 300 AD to 538 AD. The name comes from the Kofun, large earthen burial mounds built during this period. [1] An antique Japanese comic demon mask, Edo Period (1603 - 1868) c. 19th Century. [1] The Edo period that lasted from 1603 AD to 1868 AD saw the rise of Japan's isolationistic policy. [1] The Edo period is also called as Tokugawa Period and it stretched from 1603 AD to 1868 AD. In this period the state administration was shared by nearly 200 Daimyo. [1]

It revived an ancient imperial tradition, banished the feudal regime of the Tokugawa shogunate, and sent Japan hurdling into modernity. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate has continued to rule a Japan, which it has isolated from the rest of the world, bringing it political stability and peace. [1] Under the Tokugawa shogunate, Japan enjoyed internal peace, political stability, and economic growth. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate wanted to maintain political and social stability in Japan. [1] Politically, the problem was also complicated by the Tokugawa government which felt it necessary to gain a consensus throughout Japan on how to deal with the West: this was a reflection of the uncertainty and weakness within the Tokugawa shogunate. [1] Unfortunately, this milestone also led to telescope manufacturing being initially banned in Japan by the Tokugawa shogunate due to its dual purpose as a military application. [1] After the Meiji restoration, the leaders of the samurai who overthrew the Tokugawa shogunate had no pre-developed plan on how to run Japan. [1] The capital of Japan was moved from Kyoto to Tokyo during the Meiji Restoration, which began at the end of the Tokugawa Shogunate. [1] Anti-western daimyo, particularly in the southern provinces of Choshu and Satsuma, blamed the Tokugawa shogunate for its inability to defend Japan against the foreign barbarians. [1] In this lesson, we looked at how Japan was able to both unify and take the first steps towards modernization as a result of the warlords and the Tokugawa Shogunate. [1] Tokugawa Shogunate in Japan Time of chaos Three Great Unifiers -Nobunaga -Hideyoshi -Tokugawa Tokugawa Shogunate -1598-1868. [1] With a jolt, the Tokugawa shogunate was gone, and Japan had entered the modern world. [1] Another important hero of the period was Toshimichi Okubo, A samurai retainer in the Satsuma domain, he was instrumental in the overthrow of the Tokugawa shogunate and was one of the main founders of the Meiji government and was the powerful politician in the Meiji administration until he was assassinated in 1878. [1] After political pressure, the Tokugawa government fell and the power of Emperor Meiji was restored.On November 9, 1867 at Nojo Castle, Shogun Tokugawa Yoshinobu ended the Tokugawa Shogunate by resigning as the 15th Tokugawa Shogun. [1] The Tokugawa Shogunate ruled from Edo castle until the Meiji Restoration at which time the Shoguns were displaced from power and reduced in rank to Ronin. [1] Because the city of Edo (now Tokyo) was its capital, the Tokugawa shogunate is frequently identified as the Edo bakufu, and the period of Tokugawa rule is often labeled the Edo era. [1] The Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) also known as the Tokugawa shogunate or the Edo bakufu, was preceded by the Sengoku period (warring states.) [1] 'Expel the barbarians' (or joi) was another of the major slogans which was employed in opposition to the Tokugawa shogunate in the last years of the period it meant that the government should act to reject all new contact with Westerners, permitting only the centuries old trade with the Dutch at Nagasaki port. [1] A significant figure during the time period between the 15th and 18th Century was the Tokugawa Shogunate. [1] By the middle of the nineteenth century, some of the more powerful daimyo, who were increasingly concerned about national defense against the incursion of the Western imperial powers, had begun to take the lead in carrying out their own military modernizing reforms and were increasingly ignoring the Tokugawa Shogunate. [1] Tokugawa Ieyasu, first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate, by Kanō Tan'yū, Osaka Castle main tower: Ieyasu had a number of qualities that enabled him to rise to power. [1] Three years later, the leader of the victorious Eastern Army, Tokugawa Ieyasu, founded the Tokugawa shogunate and became the country’s first shōgun. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate ruled from Edo Castle and the years of the shogunate became known as the Edo period. [2] In the centuries from the time of the Kamakura bakufu, which existed in equilibrium with the imperial court, to the Tokugawa shogunate, an evolution occurred in which the bushi ( samurai class) became the unchallenged rulers in what historian Edwin O. Reischauer called a "centralized feudal" form of government. [1] The political entity of this period was the Tokugawa shogunate. [1] Alternate residence duty, or sankin kotai, was a system developed in the Warring States period and perfected by the Tokugawa shogunate. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate could point out that the treaty was not actually signed by the Shogun or any of his rōjū, and by the agreement made, had at least temporarily averted the possibility of immediate military confrontation. [4] The policy was enacted by the Tokugawa shogunate under Tokugawa Iemitsu, the third shogun of the Tokugawa dynasty, through a number of edicts and policies from 1633-39. [4] The new government declared the restoration of the emperor as the only sovereign and the abolishment of old institutions within the royal court in addition to the Tokugawa Shogunate. [1] These two leaders supported the Emperor Kōmei and were brought together by Sakamoto Ryōma for the purpose of challenging the ruling Tokugawa shogunate, after Emperor Kōmeis death on January 30,1867, Emperor Meiji ascended the throne on February 3. [1] It occurred in the latter half of the 19th century, a period that spans both the late Edo period (often called Late Tokugawa shogunate) and the beginning of the Meiji Era. [1] 徳川日本 EDO JAPAN: 1603-1868 TOKUGAWA SHOGUNATE. Early Modern Japan 1603-1854 Also known as… Edo Period Tokugawa Period. [1] The Tokugawa shogunate, which governed from Edo (modern Tokyo ), presided over a prosperous and peaceful era known as the Edo period (1600-1868). [1] Constant moving/traveling back and forth in the Edo Era, as the Tokugawa Shogunate was known, contributed to the expansion of infrastructure (the Tokkaido Road for example) and a rich mercantile/urban culture. [1] During its final 30 years in power the Tokugawa shogunate had to contend with peasant uprisings and samurai unrest as well as with financial problems. [3] As more people became unhappy with the censorship, isolation, and rigid social structure of the Tokugawa shogunate, a call to return to imperial power began. [1] This sudden imposition of outside power did not immediately bring down the Tokugawa shogunate, even though other western countries quickly followed the American lead -- however, it did signal the beginning of the end for the Tokugawas. [5] At the time the Tokugawa Shogunate was dealing with a complex domestic political situation and wished to avoid war, although their critics supported declaring war on the United States. [1] Convention of Kanagawa : The first treaty between the United States of America and the Tokugawa Shogunate. [4]

Tokugawa Ieyasu fought in over a dozen major battles, and rose to establish the most impressive shogunate in Japan's history. [1] By the mid-17th century, Neo-Confucianism was Japan's dominant legal philosophy and contributed directly to the development of the kokugaku, a school of Japanese philology and philosophy that originated during the Tokugawa period. [1] Tokugawa Ieyasu was Japan's most powerful general but nothing more until 1603, when he obtained the title of shogun--more formally, seii taishôgun, Barbarian-Conquering Generalissimo--which was the time-honored attribute of the military leader having greatest authority. [1]

Bakumatsu refers to the final years of the Edo period when the Tokugawa shogunate ended. [4] Internally, debate over foreign policy and popular outrage over perceived appeasement to the foreign powers was a catalyst for the eventual end of the Tokugawa shogunate. [4] The civil war known as the Boshin War decided the fate of the Tokugawa shogunate. [4]

A contributing factor to the demise of the Tokugawa Shogunate, also known as the Bakumatsu period. [6] Tokugawa Ieyasu, who founded the shogunate in 1603 in present-day Tokyo. [7]

RANKED SELECTED SOURCES(28 source documents arranged by frequency of occurrence in the above report)


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